Betws Y Coed

Betws-y-Coed is North Wales' most popular inland resort. It is where the River Conwy meets its three tributaries flowing from the west, the Llugwy, the Lledr and the Machno. Much of it was built in Victorian times and it is the principal village of the Snowdonia National Park.

Set in a beautiful valley in the Snowdonia Forest Park, it is ideal for outdoor activity holidays. Numerous Craft and outdoor activity shops are in the village with the popular Swallow Falls nearby.

It’s has a wonderful setting surrounded by dense woodland and magnificent mountain country is only part of the answer. The beauty of the area is enhanced by cascading waterfalls, hill-top lakes, river pools and ancient bridges. Ever since the Victorian artists flocked to the area and formed the first artist colony it has been a mecca for those that appreciate its unique natural beauty.

The main street, Holyhead Road, has numerous shops that specialise in outdoor clothes and the tourist center provide maps and advice on day trips in the area.
At the railway station is a Museum with a miniature railway, shop and restaurant. The old 14th century church of St Michael's is one of the oldest in Wales and is worth viewing.

Of exceptional interest are the many bridges in the area. Pont-y-Pair (the bridge of the cauldron), built in 1468, is buffeted by foaming water after heavy rain. A number of sign-posted walks in the surrounding countryside start near this bridge. A mile or so away is the Miner's Bridge, on the road to Capel Curig, where the miners crossed the river on a steep ladder to their work

Thomas Telford's iron Waterloo Bridge built in 1815, which carries the A5 across the River Conwy, bears the cast iron inscription "This arch was constructed in the same year the battle of Waterloo was fought". Also worth visiting are the awesome Conwy Falls off the road to Pentrefoelas and the beautiful Fairy Glen off the A470 where the River Conwy flows through a narrow gorge.